Fairy Tale: Do I Go for Dwarves Riding Dragons or Seven Faeries?

Fairy Tale: Do I Go for Dwarves Riding Dragons or Seven Faeries?

Fairy Tale

Fairy Tale is a fast-paced card game centered around “drafting.” For those unfamiliar, drafting is when you choose a card from your hand and pass the rest to the next player, and do so until all cards have been chosen.

In Fairy Tale, you get five cards for each of four rounds, and play three of those five; the goal is to combine your cards to get the most points. It has a slight sabotage element as black cards will force players to flip over cards, rendering them useless, but for the most part it’s just about trying to get the cards most beneficial to you while denying your opponent the ones most beneficial to them. It can get very competitive, but the games tend to be short enough that the competitiveness isn’t bothersome even to easily-stressed Steffanie.

Other than someone having difficulty with the concept of drafting, this game isn’t difficult to learn, either in gameplay or in strategy. There are only really three strategies for scoring (that can be combined): exponential (a card type that scales to X squared: 1 of the card is worth 1, 2 are worth 2 each so total 4, etc.), paired (one card type is worth 3, with a second being worth 3 times the number of cards of the first type), and high points (cards worth a flat 6 but that turn a member of their own faction, including themselves potentially, face-down). If that still sounds complicated, don’t worry–it’s very obvious once you’re reading the cards.

That is not to say, though, that Fairy Tale is too simple — there is enough strategic depth, in the very nature of drafting if nothing else, that the game actually has some staying power, and the Black cards complicate strategies. Similarly, while the best ways to score points are the geometric sets, cross-faction partners, or big-point cards, a combined arms strategy is often needed to win the game: you can’t rely on getting nothing but Baby Dragons so you have to make the best use of the cards you do get.

For those desiring even more layers, there are an extra few cards that are “Advanced” cards.  They allow the game to support up to five players instead of four, add a new mechanic called the Hunt (A pre-emptive offensive flip), and feature cards with alternate scoring opportunities such as having the most of a particular faction or card type, the latter of those features being marked but unused in the base game.

As is often the case, since the game is physically small (though I believe more recent editions have a larger box for shelf presence), it also tends to play quickly, and it’s not uncommon at our gaming table play Fairy Tale two or three times in a row.